Being a Daughter of the “Greatest Generation”

Tom Brokaw wrote the book The Greatest Generation in 1998. These men and women grew up in the US and experienced the Great Depression. During and after World War II, this generation stepped up to do amazing things. In the book, Brokaw wrote, “it is, I believe, the greatest generation any society has ever produced”. He argued that these men and women fought not for fame and recognition, but because it was the “right thing to do”.

My dad, Robert Shultz, fought in World War II, serving in the navy on the USS Missouri battleship. When he returned from the war, he utilized the GI bill to get a university education. He then went on to become a successful businessman. Men returning from the war threw themselves into rebuilding their lives and the economy with a zest of working hard.

Baby Boomers like myself were born roughly between 1946-1966 following the war. (I was born in 1963.) The “Greatest Generation” bar was set high for us boomer kids. In some respects, that was a good thing. I learned to value hard work, education and strong morals. Sons born to this generation may have been more affected by the high bar of standards than daughters. What if the sons could not achieve the level of success of their fathers under ordinary circumstances? Is it possible that dads might look down upon their sons or boys might find it difficult to match or surpass their father’s bar of success? [Read more…]

Robert Vernon Shultz Obituary

Cowboy Bob9Robert Vernon Shultz, 1925-2015 grew up in South Dakota but spent the majority of his life in Colorado. He was proud of his one room schoolhouse education for the first three grades. He lived in a house without electricity or running water until he was nine years old. His parents, Jane and Ralph Shultz, gave up farming, moved to town and opened a hardware store in Wessington Springs.

After graduating from Wessington Springs High School, he volunteered for the Navy in 1943. He was assigned to the Battleship USS Missouri during World War II as a radio operator. The ship was the site of the Japanese Surrender Ceremonies ending the war in Tokyo Bay, September 2, 1945.

Bob married Norma Schwabauer in 1948, graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1951 and then moved to Colorado. He started his insurance career with O’Rourke and Daniels in Denver and with his wife raised four children, Rob, Lindy, Randy and Lisa, in suburban Cherry Hills Village. He founded The High Country Corporation in 1955 and sold out in 1979. [Read more…]

The 70th Anniversary of VJ Day-The End Of World War 2

September 2, 1945
This was the day World War II ended in the Pacific. The Japanese surrendered aboard the USS Missouri, the battleship my dad Robert V. Shultz was on at the end of the war. View a video showing about the ceremony.

 

Here are my Dad’s words about that day:

It started out as a gray day, sort of cool. Ships everywhere and lots of small craft. Busy, busy. Plying to and from the ships. Battlewagons, Cruisers, Tin Cans, Supply ships, Service Craft were everywhere. Must have been the biggest assembly of ships ever. Lots of war planes too. Heavy patrolling. Everyone on board was in awe of the scene. We were in Tokyo Bay, at anchor, the first real port city since leaving Pearl Harbor in December while we were still on Condition Easy. All guns manned, but you knew it was over. The defeat was complete. It was hard to believe what we heard about the big bombs. [Read more…]