Dear Dr. G

Dear Dr. G.,

I respect your medical education, training and years of experience as a gynecologist. I have always felt you were on top of your game…within the western medicine model.

I began to suspect that you were not open to alternative medicine practices when you scoffed at my ability to navigate the changes of menopause on my own such as hot flashes without hormone replacements because I sought natural treatment of herbs and needles from my acupuncturist. When I came in for annual exams, you appeared to assume I would finally give up on my own remedies and move into the treatments you suggested and promoted.

In June of 2014, my annual exam and subsequent in-office biopsy showed “Severe squamous dysplasia/carcinoma in SITU.” You told me I would need outpatient surgery and removal of part of my cervix with more biopsies, I agreed. I asked you what I should do in the two weeks while waiting for surgery, and you said, “nothing”. Well, I did everything I could think of and wrote extensively about it. Click here for previous blog post.

When I did what you said was impossible to do in only 2 weeks and then had no interest in knowing what I did, I was disappointed to say the least. I began to search for books written by physicians who were interested in miracles and spontaneous healing events.

Two books I found were Love, Medicine & Miracles: Lessons Learned About Self-Healing From A Surgeon’s Experience With Exceptional Patients by Bernie S. Siegel, M.D. and Spontaneous Healing: How To Discover And Enhance Your Body’s Natural Ability To Maintain and Heal Itself by Andrew Weil, M.D. Both these doctors were willing to look at unusual cases of healing. [Read more…]

What My Doctor Didn’t Want To Know

I believe in miracles, and I just experienced one. My doctor might call it an aberration or a strange phenomenon. For many western medicine doctors, a miracle is too far of a stretch. Miracles are outside of their paradigm. Western medicine doctors save lives and do amazing things, but sometimes they get mystified. I have stumped my doctor to the point of her seeking another doctor’s opinion on how to explain what she said is not possible. They are confounded.

I had two weeks to wait for surgery. I could tell my doctor wanted me to have the surgery the following week based on my results, but it was a holiday week (Independence Day), and she wasn’t doing surgery that week. So I had two weeks to wait. I asked her what I should do during those two weeks and her answer was “nothing”. I did everything instead. Let’s begin at the beginning.

On Monday June 16, 2014 I had my annual pap exam with my gynecologist. She found 3 things wrong: Active HPV (Human papillomavirus), and atypical glandular cells and atypical squamous cells. I was then scheduled for an in-office biopsy, which occurred the following Monday June 23. This procedure was terribly painful, and I almost passed out.

3 days later, I got a call from my doctor. She said that the results were not good and that a more in-depth biopsy as outpatient surgery was indicated. She did not read me the exact wording of the lab report, and I am glad she didn’t. It would have freaked me out even worse than I already was at the time. But later, I got the actual report and it said that in my cervix, the biopsy showed “Severe squamous dysplasia/carcinoma in SITU.” Not a good diagnosis. The doctor also mentioned a hysterectomy might come later.

I had had some problematic pap tests over the years due to HPV, which I contracted in the 90’s, and I had had an in-office biopsy before, but nothing serious ever resulted. This new development alarmed me to put it lightly. I thought to myself, “I have 2 weeks to get rid of this issue” and immediately made changes. Because some people have asked me what I did, I will share the information with the caveat that this is my experience and my body, and I cannot promise this list will have the same results for you if you have a health concern. [Read more…]