Are You An Internet, Email and Facebook Addict?

I will admit, I am an addict. Yes, checking my email and Facebook is a part of my day, every day throughout the day. I have attempted to wean myself with occasional, moderate success. I have thinned out my email, unsubscribing to newsletters and other unwanted notices. I have reduced my inbox to under 50 and on a good day to under 20. I have created files of important emails to keep as reference and I periodically review and weed out obsolete items. I think all that just means I am an organized addict and that I am fooling myself to think that those measures make me less hooked!

Despite becoming efficient and proficient, I am obsessed with checking my email and checking in on Facebook. I log on in the morning and review my accounts over my cereal and coffee. I don’t feel I can move on to other things of greater importance like writing my next book or this article until I have cleaned out new emails and reviewed the newsfeed on Facebook. Real work or productivity comes second.

I have made strides in posting less on Facebook unless I am traveling (I love to post travel pictures). Now a few days can go by without a Facebook update from me but never a week! I love to feel connected to my friends and relatives, many of whom live far away from me and I might be out of touch with their lives without Facebook. I learn things, laugh and feel a part of a community when I browse the newsfeed. If I don’t look in, I feel a loss of not knowing what is going on in the world (I have stopped watching TV) and I begin to feel invisible.

I recently finished reading the book The Shallows, What The Internet Is Doing To Our Brains by Nicholas Carr. He described having more difficulty keeping his attention focused on concentrated reading and deep contemplation. I have been noticing this trend myself, and it bothers me. [Read more…]

Dear Dr. G

Dear Dr. G.,

I respect your medical education, training and years of experience as a gynecologist. I have always felt you were on top of your game…within the western medicine model.

I began to suspect that you were not open to alternative medicine practices when you scoffed at my ability to navigate the changes of menopause on my own such as hot flashes without hormone replacements because I sought natural treatment of herbs and needles from my acupuncturist. When I came in for annual exams, you appeared to assume I would finally give up on my own remedies and move into the treatments you suggested and promoted.

In June of 2014, my annual exam and subsequent in-office biopsy showed “Severe squamous dysplasia/carcinoma in SITU.” You told me I would need outpatient surgery and removal of part of my cervix with more biopsies, I agreed. I asked you what I should do in the two weeks while waiting for surgery, and you said, “nothing”. Well, I did everything I could think of and wrote extensively about it. Click here for previous blog post.

When I did what you said was impossible to do in only 2 weeks and then had no interest in knowing what I did, I was disappointed to say the least. I began to search for books written by physicians who were interested in miracles and spontaneous healing events.

Two books I found were Love, Medicine & Miracles: Lessons Learned About Self-Healing From A Surgeon’s Experience With Exceptional Patients by Bernie S. Siegel, M.D. and Spontaneous Healing: How To Discover And Enhance Your Body’s Natural Ability To Maintain and Heal Itself by Andrew Weil, M.D. Both these doctors were willing to look at unusual cases of healing. [Read more…]

Understanding What Triggers Illness or Disease

Since I wrote my blog about overcoming a recent health issue, I received some questions about why I developed a health challenge in the first place when I have always maintained physical fitness and healthy choices for most of my life. I eat nutritious food and take good care of myself. I rarely if ever even have a cold. I am happy and have a lifestyle that is full of life.

So I decided to address this question based on my personal experience and life history. I am not a doctor, scientist or healthcare practitioner. Since I recently experienced a health miracle and wrote about the measures I took to boost my health and healing naturally in my blog entitled, “What My Doctor Didn’t Want To Know”, I have paused to consider why I had a health crisis and how to prevent one in the future.

I share my thoughts as a human being who likes to look for answers, turn over assumptions, shift paradigms and try new things. If what I say resonates with you, grab it. If what I write doesn’t feel true for you, discard it. My experience and conclusions are unique to me and may not be a part of your particular journey. Nonetheless, here is my theory on why I have ever experienced lapses in good health. [Read more…]

What My Doctor Didn’t Want To Know

I believe in miracles, and I just experienced one. My doctor might call it an aberration or a strange phenomenon. For many western medicine doctors, a miracle is too far of a stretch. Miracles are outside of their paradigm. Western medicine doctors save lives and do amazing things, but sometimes they get mystified. I have stumped my doctor to the point of her seeking another doctor’s opinion on how to explain what she said is not possible. They are confounded.

I had two weeks to wait for surgery. I could tell my doctor wanted me to have the surgery the following week based on my results, but it was a holiday week (Independence Day), and she wasn’t doing surgery that week. So I had two weeks to wait. I asked her what I should do during those two weeks and her answer was “nothing”. I did everything instead. Let’s begin at the beginning.

On Monday June 16, 2014 I had my annual pap exam with my gynecologist. She found 3 things wrong: Active HPV (Human papillomavirus), and atypical glandular cells and atypical squamous cells. I was then scheduled for an in-office biopsy, which occurred the following Monday June 23. This procedure was terribly painful, and I almost passed out.

3 days later, I got a call from my doctor. She said that the results were not good and that a more in-depth biopsy as outpatient surgery was indicated. She did not read me the exact wording of the lab report, and I am glad she didn’t. It would have freaked me out even worse than I already was at the time. But later, I got the actual report and it said that in my cervix, the biopsy showed “Severe squamous dysplasia/carcinoma in SITU.” Not a good diagnosis. The doctor also mentioned a hysterectomy might come later.

I had had some problematic pap tests over the years due to HPV, which I contracted in the 90’s, and I had had an in-office biopsy before, but nothing serious ever resulted. This new development alarmed me to put it lightly. I thought to myself, “I have 2 weeks to get rid of this issue” and immediately made changes. Because some people have asked me what I did, I will share the information with the caveat that this is my experience and my body, and I cannot promise this list will have the same results for you if you have a health concern. [Read more…]